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dc.contributor.advisorLee, Tina
dc.contributor.advisorJuelich, Courtney
dc.contributor.authorNuechterlein​, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-29T16:40:44Z
dc.date.available2024-04-29T16:40:44Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/85185
dc.description.abstractCivic knowledge is pivotal in creating informed citizens who participate in government​. Lack of education and interest in history could be diminishing citizens’ ability to participate​. This research is centered on measuring students’ knowledge by measuring their performance on the US citizenship test. The hypothesis that most US citizens would not be able to pass the US citizenship test was proven false, 81% of participants passed​. A person’s gender, race, and major do affect test scores.​ Demographics such as income, religion, and political affiliation have no impact​. Scores for map identification were much lower and show a need for enhanced education and importance​. Low map scores indicate a concerning lack of geographical knowledge among US college students​. Recommend increasing education in geography in high school by increasing class offerings, testing, and teaching.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin--Stouten_US
dc.titleWhat do Americans Know?: A Study on the Relationship between Students US Civic Knowledge and their Demographics​en_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.rights.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US


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