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dc.contributor.authorDeVore, Philip W.
dc.contributor.authorBrooke, Larry T.
dc.contributor.authorSwenson, William A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-05T15:17:03Z
dc.date.available2022-08-05T15:17:03Z
dc.date.issued1978-10-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/83438
dc.description.abstractRed clay erosion in southwestern Lake Superior has been a natural process along shorelines and in tributary streams and rivers since decline of lake levels following the Pleistocene period. Exposure of the unconsolidated glacial lake deposits resulted in fairly high and constant rates of erosion long before man began to alter the landscape. Rates of erosion along the Lake Superior shoreline have averaged up to 3.1 meters/year since 1938 (1) with contributions of 2· x. 106 metric tons of red clay soils annually ( 2). An additional 5.6 x 105 metric tons are added by stream erosion (3). There is evidence that rates of erosion were accelerated by logging operations during the late 1800's, but this increase probably did not add significantly to the impact of the red clays on the Lake Superior ecosystem.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEPAen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectred clayen_US
dc.subjectturbidityen_US
dc.subjectsedimentationen_US
dc.subjectaquatic lifeen_US
dc.subjectNemadji Riveren_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF RED CLAY TURBIDITY AND SEDIMENTATION ON AQUATIC LIFE IN THE NEMADJI RIVER SYSTEMen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US


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