Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEddy, Raina
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-19T16:25:26Z
dc.date.available2022-05-19T16:25:26Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/83179
dc.descriptionAdvisor: Lisa Naughton; Includes survey data, references, appendix (survey questions administered).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of some wildlife species in urban areas draws attention from ecologists and social scholars, alike, especially for controversial species like the coyote (Canis latrans). Geographers investigate urban citizens’ attitudes toward wildlife as part of new forms of ‘urban nature’. A gap in the research is whether actual encounters with wildlife have any impact on attitudes or behavior. This paper shares r esults of a public survey regarding encounters, behavior and perceptions of coyotes around Owen Conservation Park (97 acres) in Madison, WI. Coyotes frequently roam through the surrounding residential area, to the delight of some neighbors and fear of others, particularly given that on occasion pets are attacked. I sent mail surveys to 275 residents within 100 meters of the park to document if and how experiences with coyotes shape local attitudes and behavior. Survey questions tallied reported direct experiences with coyotes, behavioral change resulted from these encounters, and management preferences. The overwhelmingly positive attitudes reported in this survey stand apart those published from other urban surveys in the U.S. The majority of respondents ( 68%, n=156) reported they liked coyotes somewhat” or very much. Additionally, 60% of respondents felt that the presence of coyotes in Owen Conservation Park made them feel more positive about this natural area. I also found some evidence that some attitudes are correlated with a respondent’s type of experience. Respondents with negative experiences were more likely to approve a lethal management option. Most sociodemographic variables showed no relation with a respondent’s attitudes towards coyotes; however, positive correlations were found between years of education and how much a resident likes coyotes and their preferred coyote population management, and between length of residency and the severity of management response when a coyote kills a domestic animal. Last, not all respondents followed recommended pet and yard management strategies for avoiding conflict with coyotes. Namely, walking their dog on a leash, taking pets inside after dark, and enclosing compositing in their yard. Using knowledge of these attitudes to understand the context behind the conflict may help wildlife managers to reduce or prevent coyote-human conflict in the area.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch was supported by the Trewartha Family; Trewartha Undergraduate Honors Research Grant.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjecturban wildlifeen_US
dc.subjectcoyoteen_US
dc.subjectCanis latransen_US
dc.subjecturban natureen_US
dc.subjectwildlife encountersen_US
dc.subjectattitudesen_US
dc.subjectsurveyen_US
dc.subjectOwen Conservation Parken_US
dc.subjectMadison, Wisconsinen_US
dc.subjectpopulation managementen_US
dc.subjectcoyote-human conflicten_US
dc.titleLiving with Coyotes; Madison Citizens’ Experiences and Attitudesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record