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dc.contributor.authorLiegl, Steven A., Jr.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-17T19:49:25Z
dc.date.available2021-11-17T19:49:25Z
dc.date.issued2021-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/82460
dc.descriptionThis file was last viewed in Adobe Acrobat Pro.en_US
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, organizations have provided the necessary task-related devices (e.g., laptops, smartphones, tablets) for employees. However, recent years have seen alternative devices belonging to employees or other sources used in corporate settings for completing work tasks. With the desires for flexible work conditions and constant connection, bring your own device (BYOD) policies have become ubiquitous. Building on adoption theories and prior BYOD research, this dissertation seeks to create a foundational model for evaluating the factors associated with BYOD adoption and use. In Essay 1, I focus on understanding and enumerating the patterns of BYOD use in corporate settings based on various user-level factors over a period of time. I conducted time series analyses on secondary data of employees’ systems captured in their databases to demonstrate the change over time and provide future forecasting of BYOD adoption. Findings showed that in an organization that has a BYOD program there are varying levels of individual usage, regardless of device type, and receiving a financial incentive can have an impact on adoption and use. In Essay 2, I drew upon adaptive structuration theory (AST) and tested a research model of BYOD adoption and use. I theorized that security, data ownership, privacy, and financial factors influence exploratory and exploitative task and technology adaptation of BYOD. Further, I posited that such adaptation will positively impact BYOD use. The research model was tested using a survey of employees on their use of BYOD in corporate settings. Findings showed that the antecedent factors have a significant influence on exploratory and exploitative task and technology adaptation, which in turn influence BYOD use within the organization. Therefore, this study highlights the mediating role of task and technology adaption factors, demonstrating the significance of adaptive structuration in the BYOD context. Findings from this dissertation have important academic implications to the BYOD literature, extending the application of AST to the context of BYOD. Notably, findings from this dissertation have practical significance to help organizations understand data ownership, security considerations, and financial incentives which encourage BYOD adoption and use.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin - Whitewateren_US
dc.subjectInformation technology -- Managementen_US
dc.subjectInternal securityen_US
dc.subjectData protectionen_US
dc.titleBring your own device programs within the enterprise : the antecedent effects on bring your own device adoption and useen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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