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dc.contributor.authorFiori, Marie E.
dc.contributor.authorBagchi, Kushal
dc.contributor.authorToney, Michael F.
dc.contributor.authorEdiger, M. D.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-30T01:51:28Z
dc.date.available2021-09-30T01:51:28Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/82341
dc.description.abstractGlasses prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are anisotropic, and the average molecular orientation can be varied significantly by controlling the deposition conditions. While previous work has characterized the average structure of thick PVD glasses, most experiments are not sensitive to the structure near an underlying substrate or interface. Given the profound influence of the substrate on the growth of crystalline or liquid crystalline materials, an underlying substrate might be expected to substantially alter the structure of a PVD glass, and this near-interface structure is important for the function of organic electronic devices prepared by PVD, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). To study molecular packing near buried organic-organic interfaces, we prepare superlattice structures (stacks of 5 or 10 nm layers) of organic semiconductors, Alq3 (tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum) and DSA-Ph (1,4-di-[4-(N,N-diphenyl)amino]styrylbenzene) using PVD. Superlattice structures significantly increase the fraction of the films near buried interfaces, thereby allowing for quantitative characterization of interfacial packing. Remarkably, both X-ray scattering and spectroscopic ellipsometry indicate that the substrate exerts a negligible influence on PVD glass structure. Thus, the surface equilibration mechanism previously advanced for thick films can successfully describe PVD glass structure even within the first monolayer of deposition on an organic substrate.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, DE‐SC0002161 University of Wisconsin Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (Grant DMR-1720415) Use of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUnited States National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectorganic glassen_US
dc.subjectburied interfacesen_US
dc.subjectX-ray scatteringen_US
dc.subjectphysical vapor depositionen_US
dc.titleSurface equilibration mechanism controls the molecular packing of glassy molecular semiconductors at organic interfacesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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