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dc.contributor.authorPati, Bhabna
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorKanneganti, Nitin
dc.contributor.authorHossain, Nishat
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-22T11:04:15Z
dc.date.available2021-05-22T11:04:15Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81980
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2018en_US
dc.description.abstractThe physiological effect that a crying infant has on its caregivers is a well-studied phenomenon. An infant’s cries activate fear circuits in the brain, with the involvement of the amygdala indicated. The purpose of this study is to determine the physiological effect of a crying infant and a whimpering puppy on young adults (20-35 years old) to differentiate any levels of response based on gender independent of parental status. The measurements being used to quantify physiological arousal are Mean Arterial Pressure, Heart Rate, and Skin Conductance. Heart rate was obtained from using electrodes attached to the skin to measure the electrical activity of the heart. Mean arterial pressure was measured using OMRON 10 Series + Blood Pressure Monitor. Skin conductance was taken using EDA equipment. 13 participants obtained were females while 14 were males, allowing for a total of 27 participants. Using 14 male participants and 13 female participants, ANOVA comparing males and females within each experimental group of neutral, baby, and puppy was run on data. No statistically significant data was found using a widely accepted p-value of 0.05.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectIntergender analysisen_US
dc.subjectinfant cryingen_US
dc.subjectemotionally chargeden_US
dc.subjectaudiovisualen_US
dc.titlePhysiological Responses of Males and Females to Emotionally Charged Videosen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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