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dc.contributor.authorConner, Claire
dc.contributor.authorNyberg, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Yanika
dc.contributor.authorMinor, Rashea
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Nolan
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-22T10:27:20Z
dc.date.available2021-05-22T10:27:20Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81969
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2018en_US
dc.description.abstractA variety and multitude of stimuli elicit a fear response in humans, including horror films. Fear responses include various physiological alterations such as an increase in heart rate, changes in electrodermal activity (EDA), and an increased respiration rate. The type and intensity of sensory intake from a fear inducing stimulus determines the extent of physiological alterations. In order to understand the effects of auditory and visual stimuli on the fear response, a five minute horror film clip was played for 24 participants. Participants were randomly selected to participate in one of three groups: Group 1 watched the clip with audiovisual stimulus, Group 2 watched the clip with visual-only stimulus, and Group 3 watched the clip with audio-only stimulus. Since the combination of both an auditory and visual stimulus is the most intense form of sensation, it was hypothesized that participants in Group 1 would demonstrate the greatest fear response and show the largest rate of physiological change in EDA, respiration rate, and heart rate. Paired two sample t-tests and one-way ANOVA tests showed there was some statistical significance in the resulting data. Overall, this study supported the hypothesis that bimodal audiovisual fear inducing stimulus would lead to a larger physiological response.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectSounden_US
dc.subjectVisualen_US
dc.subjectSensesen_US
dc.subjectUnimodalen_US
dc.subjectAudioen_US
dc.subjectAuditoryen_US
dc.subjectBimodalen_US
dc.subjectElectrodermal Activity (EDA)en_US
dc.subjectFearen_US
dc.subjectFear Responseen_US
dc.subjectFearful Stimulusen_US
dc.subjectHeart Rateen_US
dc.subjectRespiration Rateen_US
dc.subjectSympathetic Nervous Systemen_US
dc.titlePhysiological Responses to Isolated Auditory and Visual Stimulus versus the Combination of Auditory and Visual Stimulusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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