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dc.contributor.authorBalas, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorDocter, John
dc.contributor.authorKinney, Chase
dc.contributor.authorWegener, Madeline
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Vishy
dc.contributor.authorHetzel, Erika
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-17T23:58:07Z
dc.date.available2021-05-17T23:58:07Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81870
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2017en_US
dc.description.abstractMultitasking has become a standard practice among college students. Technology plays an increasing role in modern multitasking as college students commonly use computers and phones while engaging in other activities. The goal of this study is to determine if there is any significant physiological difference in concentration when an individual multitasks with television. The study hypothesized that the distraction would produce a decrease in heart rate and an increase in alpha brain waves and eye movement. Twenty-four participants completed an eight question concentration task each assigned either the treatment, with the visual stimulus on, or the control, with no visual stimulus present. During each participant's respective treatment alpha brain wave activity, eye movement, and heart rate were measured. The analysis of the results did not indicate any statistical significance and therefore no conclusions on television distractions and concentration can be made.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectAlpha wavesen_US
dc.subjectConcentrationen_US
dc.subjectDistractionen_US
dc.subjectEEGen_US
dc.subjectEOGen_US
dc.subjectHeart Rateen_US
dc.subjectMultitaskingen_US
dc.titleEffects of a Visual Distraction on Physiological Measures and Concentrationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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