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dc.contributor.authorGiuliani, Charles
dc.contributor.authorKern, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorKleitsch, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorLukes, Cody
dc.contributor.authorZajac, Jocelyn
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-09T02:26:53Z
dc.date.available2021-04-09T02:26:53Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81635
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractPhysical exertion can influence numerous physiological indicators such as heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation of the blood. Previous studies linking these physiological effects to cognitive performance led us to ask whether physical exertion could cause a decreased state of alertness manifested as a slower reaction time. The purpose of this study is to examine how exercise affects reaction time. This potential correlation between exercise and reaction time would provide important insights into cognitive performance for application in the medical field. The participants performed an electronic reaction test before and after riding a stationary bike for one minute. Their heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were also recorded both before and after exertion. It was hypothesized that the participants’ average reaction time would be significantly slower after the exercise was performed, leading to a positive correlation between the physiological factors and reaction time. Results from a linear regression analysis did not show a significant relationship between elevated heart rate and reaction time (p-value: 0.5549). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not reveal a significant correlation either (p- value: 0.7271, p-value: 0.9394, respectively). Blood oxygen saturation showed a significant p- value of 0.006143, but this is believed to be skewed due to the presence of an outlier. A Welch two sample t-test showed that the sole treatment of exercise had no significant effect on reaction time with a p-value of 0.8943. Further research may examine the significance of a correlation between physical exertion and reaction time.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectaerobic exerciseen_US
dc.subjectblood pressureen_US
dc.subjectheart rateen_US
dc.subjectoxygen saturationen_US
dc.subjectreaction timeen_US
dc.titleEffects of Exercise-Induced Changes in Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Oxygen Saturation on Visual Reaction Timeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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