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dc.contributor.authorBalog, Justin
dc.contributor.authorKonz, Matt
dc.contributor.authorLaCroix, Miranda
dc.contributor.authorMattson, Gabrielle
dc.contributor.authorMaurer, Anna
dc.contributor.authorSinnen, Mackenzie
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-09T02:04:41Z
dc.date.available2021-04-09T02:04:41Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81630
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies have consistently shown that prolonged deprivation of vision results in the enhanced perception to auditory stimuli. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between temporary loss of vision (via blindfold) and reaction times to auditory stimuli in addition to heart rate and brain wave activity (EEG). In this study 31 (19 females and 12 males) college student participants were randomly assigned to being blindfolded or not blindfolded and monitored while performing a reaction time test. Heart rate, brain wave activity, and reaction time were recorded throughout the reaction time test. It is hypothesized that blindfolded individuals react more quickly to an auditory stimulus than seeing individuals, that participant heart rate decreases between the start of the auditory task and immediately prior to the first auditory stimulus, and that EEG beta-waves are present in individuals immediately after hearing an auditory stimulus. Our results indicate there was no statistically significant difference in reaction time between the two treatment groups. Additionally, heart rate did not significantly decrease between the start of the auditory task and first auditory stimulus. Beta waves were present in all participants immediately following the auditory stimulus. The results of this study can be used to inform future studies on short-term visual deprivation, to enhance understanding of the effects of temporary blindness on auditory perception, and to possibly inform the effects of temporary visual deprivation as a means to increase reaction time as applicable to everyday life.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectAuditory Stimulusen_US
dc.subjectElectroencephalogramen_US
dc.subjectVisual Deprivationen_US
dc.subjectReaction Timeen_US
dc.titleStress Reactivity of Participants in Response to Same vs. Opposite Gender of Experimentersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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