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dc.contributor.authorAmes, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Makenzie
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Abigail
dc.contributor.authorUmhoefer, Eric
dc.contributor.authorWilliquette, Amber
dc.contributor.authorWoldt, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-09T02:01:03Z
dc.date.available2021-04-09T02:01:03Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81629
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractBlood pressure, heart rate and respiration rate were measured to investigate the stress response induced by an emotionally stimulating video regarding the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). After control experiments were conducted on an initial set of subjects, test subjects were exposed to one of three treatment videos: audio only, visual only with subtitles, or both audio and visual with subtitles. The hypothesis being tested was that watching an emotionally evocative video featuring current terror tactics by ISIS with both audio and video will increase participants’ heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration rates more significantly compared to either watching the video with subtitles only or listening with audio only. It was hypothesized that the audio-only stimuli would also increase heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration rates but not to the extent of the combined auditory and visual stimuli. Based on the longer processing time for visual stimuli it was predicted that the visual-only stimuli would cause the smallest increases in heart rate, blood pressure and respiration rate. Statistical data analysis revealed that no treatment was more effective than another. In summary, individuals encounter different types of media formats that could potentially differ in their mental and physical effects. However, according to this study, varying media formats do not have significantly different effects on an individual’s physiological response.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectaudioen_US
dc.subjectblood pressureen_US
dc.subjectmediaen_US
dc.subjectrespirationen_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.subjectvisualen_US
dc.titleMedia Delivery Method Shows No Effect On Physiological Stress Response Factors of Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Respirationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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