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dc.contributor.authorAndropolis, Mackenzie
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Brian
dc.contributor.authorGackowski, Jason
dc.contributor.authorJacobson, Raechel
dc.contributor.authorSurges, Gabriel
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-09T01:52:29Z
dc.date.available2021-04-09T01:52:29Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81627
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractCognitive control allows us to function in a distraction­filled environment. Audible distractions compete for our attention as we attempt to focus on learning, recalling past events, or solving difficult problems. P​revious studies suggest that noise triggers a surge of stress hormones, making it more difficult for the brain to complete complex cognitive tasks, particularly those that utilize working memory. In this study, we investigated the effect of background talking noise on physiological stress response and working memory task performance. We hypothesized that physiological stress would increase and cognitive performance would decrease when subjects were exposed to a continuous, unintelligible talking noise during a working memory task. Participants between ages 20­23 (n=26) were assigned randomly to one of two conditions: a control group with exposure to no auditory stimulus (n=13) and an experimental group with exposure to the unintelligible talking noise (n=13). Blood pressure, heart rate, and electrodermal activity (EDA) were monitored for the duration of the working memory task, and task performance was recorded. Results indicated no significant effect of the experimental stimulus on heart rate, EDA, or cognitive task performance. However, the data trended towards our hypothesis, which suggests that the distraction of unintelligible talking noise may elicit a weak physiological stress response without decreasing cognitive task performance. A significant difference in mean arterial pressure (MAP) between the control and experimental groups was found. Further research is needed to better characterize the relationship between distracting auditory stimuli, physiological stress response, and cognitive performance.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectauditory stimulusen_US
dc.subjectblood pressureen_US
dc.subjectECGen_US
dc.subjectEDAen_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.subjectworking memoryen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Continuous Unintelligible Talking Noise on Physiological Stress Response and Working Memory Recallen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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