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dc.contributor.advisorTiala, Sylvia
dc.contributor.authorKitzmann, David A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-11T20:57:15Z
dc.date.available2021-03-11T20:57:15Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81456
dc.description.abstractCareer and Technical Education (CTE) and Technology Education (TE) courses have much to offer young people. It provides them an opportunity to determine and develop their interests and skills and learn about career options. Females benefit from these courses as well as males. For decades, TE courses have been male dominated, with much lower female enrollment rates across the nation. Low female enrollment is a national problem. Numerous research studies have been conducted. Minnetonka schools are recognized as a top-ranking school in Minnesota and nationally acclaimed. It is also considered an affluent community. This raised the questions of what factors lead to low female enrollment in TE and CTE courses at Minnetonka and what role the affluence factor might have in CTE courses enrollment. Through this research, literature review and study, it was determined that negative female perceptions of CTE and TE exist in Minnetonka. Key areas and potential solutions have been identified. It is hoped that this research will add to the knowledge and understanding of this problem.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin-Stouten_US
dc.subjectHigh school girlsen_US
dc.subjectTechnical educationen_US
dc.subjectWomen in technologyen_US
dc.subjectMinnesotaen_US
dc.titleIdentifying the factors for low female enrollment in technology education coursesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.levelMS
thesis.degree.disciplineCareer & Technical Education


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