Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKlemme, Diane
dc.contributor.advisorKlemme, Diane
dc.contributor.authorFelton, Rason V.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-12T19:24:00Z
dc.date.available2021-02-12T19:24:00Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/81208
dc.description.abstractResearch and legislative initiatives in the United States indicate a need to produce more graduates in the field of STEM to meet a global demand. The U.S. Department of Education has launched initiatives to fill this gap through policy, funding, business and academic partnering strategies. African American women are under-represented in the field of STEM. It is critical that government and academic institutions determine how to fill this gap using a group of people that have been notably under-represented in this field. This study determined the critical incidents that influenced self-efficacy of an African American women to pursue a career in STEM. Uncovering these critical incidents can lead to business and industry filling the gap and meeting a global demand of producing more STEM graduates. The study contributes to the knowledge of this existing problem. An interview was conducted from a sample at Gateway Technical College in Racine, Wisconsin. The sample was interviewed, and the study uncovered critical incidents that influence the self-efficacy of African American women to pursue a career in STEM. The critical incidents were math self-efficacy, family and academic advising support, and future-self visualization.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin-Stouten_US
dc.subjectAfrican American womenen_US
dc.subjectWomen in technologyen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectAfrican Americansen_US
dc.titleIdentify critical incidents that influence the self-efficacy of African American women choosing STEM careersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.levelM.S.
thesis.degree.disciplineCareer & Technical Education
thesis.degree.disciplineCareer & Technical Education


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • UW-Stout Masters Theses
    This collection holds UW-Stout Masters Theses from a variety of disciples. It is currently under edit and past theses are being added to it regularly. Theses pre-1999 are located on microfilm and will need to be requested from the archives. Contact archives@uwstout.edu with any questions.

Show simple item record