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dc.contributor.advisorFrederick, Edward
dc.contributor.advisorIbrahim, Amal
dc.contributor.advisorWachanga, Ndirangu
dc.contributor.authorVogl, Alexandria
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-31T14:53:45Z
dc.date.available2020-08-31T14:53:45Z
dc.date.issued2020-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/80457
dc.descriptionThis file was last viewed in Adobe Acrobat Pro.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the relationship among demographic and media variables impacting individual’s climate change skepticism or belief. This study also examines the relationship among climate change skepticism or belief and individual’s willingness to adopt pro-environmental behaviors. Six hundred and two undergraduate students completed this study’s survey regarding their news and entertainment media habits, skepticism towards climate change, and pro-environmental behaviors. Multiple regression analyses indicate that political orientation and gender have the largest effect on climate change skepticism. Results also show that entertainment media use was significant with climate change skepticism, while news media use was significant with climate change belief. While limited support was found to explain the relationship among climate change skepticism or belief and individual’s willingness to pursue pro-environmental behaviors, self-reported climate change knowledge had the largest influence.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin--Whitewateren_US
dc.subjectMass mediaen_US
dc.subjectClimatic changesen_US
dc.subjectSkepticismen_US
dc.titleMedia use and climate change skepticismen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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