Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGold, Jacob
dc.contributor.authorMerry, Sophia
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-02T20:39:30Z
dc.date.available2020-07-02T20:39:30Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/80355
dc.descriptionIncludes Maps, Charts, Graphs, Appendix and Bibliography.en_US
dc.description.abstractRedlining can be described as the process of color-coding a map to determine which neighborhoods should receive financial investments - including home loans - and which ones should not. This was encouraged by the U.S. government and carried out by the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation during the Great Depression as an effort to make more economical investments. Much has been written about the long-term effects of this practice, namely, segregation and racial inequality. Milwaukee, Wisconsin is an infamous example of redlining and segregation, yet little attention has been given to the state’s capital. A city known for its progressive values, Madison is one of 239 U.S. cities that was red-lined by the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation. In this paper, we will demonstrate how redlining has impacted the city of Madison after more than 80 years. We will explicate how redlining worked, introduce a qualitative background of race relations in Madison, and perform a spatial analysis of modern loan data to develop our argument.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectRedliningen_US
dc.subjectMadisonen_US
dc.subjectSegregationen_US
dc.subjectRacial inequalityen_US
dc.titleThe Legacy of Redlining in Madison, Wisconsinen_US
dc.typeField projecten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record