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dc.contributor.authorXu, Yuan
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-23T21:21:13Z
dc.date.available2020-06-23T21:21:13Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/80303
dc.description.abstractThis thesis studies a broad historical context of the yinyang academy system established during the Yuan dynasty (1260-1368). The Mongol rulers created the system in order to regulate and educate yinyang practitioners, a group of people who mainly practiced astrology, astronomy, fortune-telling, and geomancy. Examining the imperial astronomical institutions and mantic practice in China from ancient times to the early Ming (1368-1644) period, I argue that three groups shaped the establishment of the yinyang academy system: Mongol rulers who had long respected the power of Mongol shamans and attempted to prevent other royal family members from taking advantage of them and other yinyang practitioners; Chinese elites who presented their new rulers with the long-standing notion in China that the emperors in the middle kingdom should monopolize the study of astrology/astronomy in order to fulfill their duties and maintain their authority as the Son of Heaven (tianzi 天子); and Neo-Confucian scholars eager to restore and maintain public order by regulating mantic practices.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectChina--History--Yuan dynasty, 1260-1368en_US
dc.subjectChina--History--Educationen_US
dc.subjectYin-yangen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophy, Chinese--Historyen_US
dc.titleThe Yinyang Academies in Yuan China (1260-1368): Formation and Developmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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