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dc.contributor.advisorBuchanan, Kym
dc.contributor.authorRudinger, Belinda
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-28T13:05:21Z
dc.date.available2020-05-28T13:05:21Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/80185
dc.description.abstractThis mixed-methods study sought to examine the user experience of technology related to self-determination from the perspective of persons who are blind. Connections between assistive technology and Deci and Ryan’s (2017) Self-Determination Theory (SDT) were explored through the three basic needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness. The study was designed within the frameworks of post-phenomenology and positive technology, with clients from Computers for the Blind, a non-profit organization that offered computers with screen reading and screen magnification software. The TENS-Interface, a recent SDT-based instrument (Peters, Calvo, & Ryan, 2018), was administered, followed by qualitative interviews and observations called Technology Biographies (Blythe, Monk, & Park 2002). Findings showed evidence of some correlations and qualitative corroborations related to the user experience of technology related to self-determination. Recommendations are offered for further research and improvement in practices for serving individuals who are blind.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSchool of Education, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Pointen_US
dc.titleBeyond Access: Technology, Blindness, & Self-Determinationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US


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