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dc.contributor.authorDeBoth, Alexa
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Jackelyn
dc.contributor.authorTrueman, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorZejdlik, Anjoli
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T21:01:10Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T21:01:10Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/80163
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2015en_US
dc.description.abstractPast research has shown that people separated from their cell phones exhibit physiological responses related to anxiety. These responses include an increase in the release of stress hormones leading to an increase in heart rate, perspiration, and respiration rate. Because of the strong attachment young American adults have to their cell phones, the researchers hypothesized participants would show signs of anxiety when separated from their phones. To test this, twenty participants completed a word search once with their phone in their possession, and another when their phone was out of their reach. During the latter condition, an experimenter anonymously contacted the subject first by text and then by phone call. Heart rate, respiration rate, and galvanic skin response measurements were taken continuously throughout both conditions. The results obtained indicate that the only significant response supporting the researchers’ hypothesis was the skin response data. The data obtained regarding heart rate and respiration rate was not sufficient to prove that there was a measurable physiological response to being separated from one’s phone.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectanxietyen_US
dc.subjectcell phoneen_US
dc.subjectECGen_US
dc.subjectEDAen_US
dc.subjectGSRen_US
dc.subjectrespirationen_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.titlePhysiological Anxiety Responses with Cell Phone Separation and Subsequent Contacten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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