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dc.contributor.authorCooper, Trevor
dc.contributor.authorHedrick, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Brianna
dc.contributor.authorReil, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorSayaovang, Katie
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Taylor
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T20:48:51Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T20:48:51Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/80162
dc.descriptionAn article that appeared in JASS, issue 2015en_US
dc.description.abstractMany universities have turned to meditation and breathing exercises as a potential means to help students manage acute and chronic stress. We hypothesized that performing a short breathing exercise immediately after watching a horror clip would return physiological indicators of stress (including heart rate, electrodermal activity, and blood pressure) back to pre-video baseline levels faster than a control group who did not perform the meditation, as measured in university students. This was based on a rationale that a focused breathing exercise can increase parasympathetic activity and lower levels of cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone. The hypothesis was tested by having participants watch a short horror clip followed by a period of either a guided breathing exercise (experimental) or rest (control) while heart rate, electrodermal activity (EDA), respiration, and blood pressure were measured. No significant differences between the experimental and control group were supported, as p-values obtained from t-tests performed for all measurements were above a significance level of 0.05. With further study, we believe that significant data could be obtained supporting the idea that meditation can help relieve stress in college students.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Advanced Student Sciences (JASS)en_US
dc.subjectacute stressen_US
dc.subjectanticipationen_US
dc.subjectanxietyen_US
dc.subjectautonomic nervous systemen_US
dc.subjectblood pressureen_US
dc.subjectelectrodermal activityen_US
dc.subjectgalvanic skin responseen_US
dc.subjectguided meditationen_US
dc.subjectstress mitigationen_US
dc.subjectsympathetic nervous systemen_US
dc.titleMeditative Breathing Yields Inconclusive Results in Stabilizing Physiological Variables Following Fear-Induced Acute Stress in College Studentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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