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dc.contributor.authorZdroik, Trish
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-21T22:08:26Z
dc.date.available2020-05-21T22:08:26Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/80157
dc.descriptionThis nation’s quality of health care has become dependent upon the 44 million Americans (20% of the US population) who have taken on the role of family caregiving (National Alliance for Caregiving, 2018). Family caregivers are people who provide medical, social, personal, and/or other supportive care for a family member or friend who is chronically ill or disabled (National Alliance for Caregiving, 2009). The Supreme Court’s 1999 Olmstead decision that gives people the right to reject institutionalized care and receive health care in their own homes (Supreme Court, Argued April 21, 1999–Decided June 22, 1999) has led to a steady increase in the demand for in-home caregiving. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Labor (2005), the number of Americans requiring some form of supportive caregiving is predicted to double from 13 million in the year 2000 to 27 million by the year 2050. And because most people who need such care prefer to receive it at home, it is their family members who most frequently become the providers (National Alliance for Caregiving, 2009). Special attention is needed to learn how family caregivers cope with the demands of this role while simultaneously navigating the normal stressors of their everyday lives.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin-Stevens Pointen_US
dc.titleRegular Reflective Writing: Using Sense-Making Communication Structures to Improve Family Caregiver Wellbeingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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