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dc.contributor.authorFetkenheuer, Jordyn
dc.contributor.authorKleinschmidt, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorPaulich, Katie
dc.contributor.authorBleske-Rechek, April L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-23T16:27:44Z
dc.date.available2020-03-23T16:27:44Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/79957
dc.descriptionColor poster with text, charts, and graphs.en_US
dc.description.abstractHindsight bias is commonly referred to as the “I knew it all along” effect. Individuals who are informed of a specific outcome prior to judging how the event will pan out perceive that outcome as more likely to occur than do individuals who are not informed of any outcome. In essence, individuals perceive a given outcome as more obvious when they know that it happened.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Wisconsin--Eau Claire Office of Research and Sponsored Programsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUSGZE AS589;
dc.subjectHindsight biasen_US
dc.subjectSuicideen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_US
dc.subjectPostersen_US
dc.titleUnwarranted Blame : The Role of Hindsight Bias in Judgments of Suicide Likelihood and Preventabilityen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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  • Student Research Day
    Posters of collaborative student/faculty research presented at Student Research Day

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