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dc.contributor.authorHalkowski, Timothy
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-28T16:13:55Z
dc.date.available2019-08-28T16:13:55Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationHalkowski, T. (2012). 'Occasional’ drinking: Some uses of a non-standard temporal metric in primary care assessment of alcohol use. Handbook of patient-provider relationships: Raising and responding to primary concerns about health, illness, and disease. New York, NY: Hampton Press, Inc, 321-329.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/79298
dc.description.abstractIn this article we focused on two fundamentally different ways that patients’ alcohol usage is described or formulated. Generally doctors work to elicit a standardized rate of use metric (e.g., ‘six drinks per week’). But there is a fundamentally different metric that patients can invoke: a non-standard temporal metric of use, such as ‘occasional’ drinking. Invoking this metric is a method whereby patients obviate a physicians’ otherwise standard push to elicit a rate of use. Doctors and patients regularly contrast invocations of ‘occasional’ drinking with regularized, rate of use formulations of drinking, and treat the former as obviating the need to elicit or offer the latter. This analysis of the detailed interactional methods used by patients to claim to be ‘occasional’ consumers of alcohol advances lines of inquiry in several domains, to wit: the morality of cognition; the data collection practices of institutions; and the broad sweep of quantification in history.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHampton Press, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectalcohol screening, metrics, Dr-Pt communication, provider - patient communication, conversation analysisen_US
dc.title‘‘Occasional’ Drinking: Some uses of a non-standard temporal metric in primary care assessment of alcohol use'en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US


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