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dc.contributor.authorEdiger, Mark
dc.contributor.authorde Pablo, Juan
dc.contributor.authorTorkelson, John
dc.contributor.authorAntony, Lucas
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Yue
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-10T14:26:41Z
dc.date.available2018-09-10T14:26:41Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-10T14:26:41Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/78702
dc.description.abstractImprovements to the photostability of organic glasses for use in electronic applications have generally relied on modification of chemical structure. We show here that the photostability of a guest molecule can also be significantly improved - without chemical modification - by using physical vapor deposition to pack molecules more densely. Photoisomerization of the substituted azobenzene, 4,4’-diphenyl azobenzene (DPA), was studied in a vapor-deposited glass matrix of celecoxib. We directly measure photoisomerization of trans- to cis- states via UV-Vis spectroscopy and show that the rate of photoisomerization depends upon the substrate temperature used during co-deposition of the glass. Photostability correlates with the density of the glass, where the optimum glass is about tenfold more photostable than the liquid-cooled glass. Molecular simulations, which mimic photoisomerization, also demonstrate that photoreaction of a guest molecule can be suppressed in vapor-deposited glasses. From the simulations, we estimate that the region that is disrupted by a single photoisomerization event encompasses approximately 5 molecules.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUS Department of Energyen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectphotostablity, azobenzene, vapor deposition, organic glasses, mixtureen
dc.titleTenfold increase in the photostability of an azobenzene guest in vapor-deposited glass mixturesen
dc.typeArticleen


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