Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFrederick, Edward
dc.contributor.advisorDavis, Corey
dc.contributor.advisorIbrahim, Amal
dc.contributor.authorSchanen, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-30T15:47:33Z
dc.date.available2018-05-30T15:47:33Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/78473
dc.descriptionThis file was last viewed in Microsoft Edge.en
dc.description.abstractThe literature on McCombs and Shaw's 1972 theory of agenda setting has a robust history with over 425 empirical studies as of McCombs and Reynolds 2009 review. The rise of social media has allowed scholarship on agenda setting to expand. Research, however, has not examined whether agenda setting and credibility vary based on the Twitter source. An 18-day experiment was conducted at a mid-sized Midwestern university to examine the agenda setting effects of three different Twitter sources based on Manheim and Albritton's 1984 three agenda conceptualization: media, government and peer. Results demonstrated no agenda setting effects; however, a mock government organization was found as more credible than a mock news organization or peer. This indicates a shift in credibility paradigms of the early 21st century, as political figures and media outlets combat each other's credibility. These findings warrant further examination of the credibility of different sources on Twitter, and how they fit into the broader media landscape.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin--Whitewateren
dc.subjectTwitteren
dc.subjectAttribution of newsen
dc.subjectTruthfulness and falsehooden
dc.subjectMass media and public opinionen
dc.titleA bird can not set my agenda : the role of source types on credibility in agenda setting on Twitteren
dc.typeThesisen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record