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dc.contributor.advisorSazama, Debra
dc.contributor.advisorPorcari, John
dc.contributor.advisorFoster, Carl
dc.contributor.authorGiddings, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-21T13:48:31Z
dc.date.available2018-05-21T13:48:31Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-21T13:48:31Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/78408
dc.description.abstractThe Talk Test (TT), used to prescribe exercise intensity based on subjective measurements, has been widely studied, but never in children. This study evaluated the relationship between the TT and physiological changes, to determine if the TT is an appropriate measurement of exercise intensity in children. Thirteen healthy children were recruited for this study. The first exercise test was the TT, in which subjects read a passage containing over 100 words, and responded whether they could speak comfortably. The second test measured the maximal exercise capacity while also measuring gas exchange, which was used to identify each subject’s ventilatory threshold (VT). Results from the last positive (LP), equivocal (EQ), and negative (NEG) stages of the TT were compared to the subject’s VT. There were significant differences (p<0.05) between VO2 at VT and at the LP stage, in HR at VT and HR at the EQ and NEG stages, and a significant difference between RPE at VT and the LP and NEG stages. We concluded that subjects should exercise at a point where it is difficult for them to speak, below their VT. Thus, the TT is a valid tool to subjectively measure exercise intensity in children.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectExercise for childrenen
dc.subjectExercise -- Physiological aspects -- Testingen
dc.titleThe Talk Test as a measure of exercise intensity in childrenen
dc.typeThesisen


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