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dc.contributor.advisorLee, Tina, 1976-
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Hillary
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-11T21:38:48Z
dc.date.available2017-12-11T21:38:48Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifier.citationHoffman, H. (2017). Politics on campus: how social hierarchy and individual background affect political behavior. University of Wisconsin-Stout Journal of Student Research, 16, 98-113.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/77583
dc.descriptionResearch article with tables.en
dc.description.abstractToday’s college students are our future potential political leaders, and this research aims to identify voting, political participation, and leadership trends among them. With this information we can discover the political traits that this demographic finds desirable in an elected leader, and conceptualize what our future society may look like based on social and political issues that this generation feels passionate about. A survey was sent to 2,000 randomly selected University of Wisconsin-Stout students. Multiple-choice and writein questions were used to gather the political opinions and participation behaviors of the respondents. It was found that specific demographic characteristics are often related to a set of political ideas and opinions. Where one is placed within the social hierarchy has an effect on views of political leaders, level of political participation, and perception of potential future leadership roles.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Wisconsin--Stout. Office of Research and Sponsored Programsen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin--Stout. Office of Research and Sponsored Programsen
dc.rightsAll rights reserved. No part of this journal may be reproduced in any form without the permission of the University of Wisconsin-Stouten
dc.subjectstudentsen
dc.subjectparticipationen
dc.subjectpolitical leadersen
dc.subject.lcshUndergraduates--Political activityen
dc.subject.lcshPolitical leadershipen
dc.subject.lcshUniversity of Wisconsin--Stout--Students--Attitudesen
dc.titlePolitics on campus: how social hierarchy and individual background affect political behavioren
dc.typeArticleen


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