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dc.contributor.advisorHerzberg, Larry
dc.contributor.authorBady, Maria
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-20T14:56:27Z
dc.date.available2015-05-20T14:56:27Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.citationVolume IX, December 2014, pp. 10 - 22en
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/72222
dc.description.abstractA disturbing trend that has surfaced recently in slang language is to use the word rape in a joking or hyperbolic manner. An example of this is, "I raped that exam!" In this paper, I argue that such use of the term rape is immoral. I begin by modeling my case after British philosopher Rae Langton's argument that pornography "silences" the speech of women in a particular way. I then discuss Alexander Bird's objection to Langton's notion of "silencing." In the end, I develop a hybrid theory that respects the cogency of Bird's objection while retaining the spirit of Langton's view. By analyzing communication in a novel way, I argue that the slang use of the word rape immorally silences rape victims/survivors, although not in the way Langton's argument would suggest. * This article may be triggering to survivors of sexual assault and abuse.en
dc.subjectPornographyen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.subjectSexual Violenceen
dc.subjectRapeen
dc.titleAgainst the Slang Use of the Word Rape: A Langtonian-Birdian Reproachen
dc.typeArticleen


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