Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWright, Mary
dc.contributor.authorBaumeister, Sharon Kay
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-25T17:06:29Z
dc.date.available2015-03-25T17:06:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/71257
dc.descriptionPlan B Paper. 2015. Master of Science in Education- Reading--University of Wisconsin-River Falls. Teacher Education Department. 29 leaves. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 22-24).en
dc.description.abstractI teach Sophomore English at an all-girls' college preparatory school. Promoting and improving reading comprehension is a major curricular objective, and like many high school and college teachers, I teach, assign, and encourage my students to mark-up their texts as they read to annotate, believing that,in doing so, students will read more actively, connect with textual ideas, retain information, and understand with greater depth. Do they? This research explored the efficacy of text annotation as a means to facilitate engagement, retention, and comprehension. My sophomores studied a variety of annotation models, learned how to annotate, completed a Reading Habits Survey, annotated narrative excerpts while reading Charles Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities, and reflected on the annotation process. The literature review and collected data suggest that annotation is a useful strategy that fosters engagement and comprehension.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subject.lcshReading (Secondary)
dc.subject.lcshReading comprehension
dc.subject.lcshHigh school students--Books and reading
dc.titleAnnotation: Every reader's superhero reading strategyen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelMSEen
thesis.degree.disciplineReadingen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record