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dc.contributor.authorHuck, Staci M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-01T17:47:04Z
dc.date.available2014-10-01T17:47:04Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/69771
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the impact of full-day kindergarten versus half-day kindergarten on student literacy achievement. The participant samples were drawn from a suburban school district in the Midwest. This study uses the district's mandated DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators or Basic Early Literacy Skills) assessment for letter fluency. The assessment aims to identify students who may need additional literacy support early. The literacy data obtained were examined, in this case, to measure possible relationships between fall-day kindergarten and half-day kindergarten programs. Evidence revealed in this study suggests that those students exposed to full-day kindergarten display greater literacy growth than their peers in half-day kindergarten. Unlike previous research that looked at the impact of all-day kindergarten on urban and low- income students, this study took place in a more affluent district. Still students in the all-day classes showed significant differences in their letter fluency achievement when compared to either only AM or PM half-day kindergarten students.en
dc.subjectDynamic Indicators or Basic Early Literacy Skillsen
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectEducational Leadership
dc.subjectliteracy achievementen
dc.subjectMidwesten
dc.subjectfull-day kindergartenen
dc.subjecthalf-day kindergartenen
dc.subjectDIBELSen
dc.titleKindergarten Efficacy: A Comparative Analysis of Literacy Achievement Outcomes and Length And Time of Kindergarten Programsen
dc.typeThesisen


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