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dc.contributor.advisorKoch, James
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Sonia G.
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-06T17:28:34Z
dc.date.available2013-11-06T17:28:34Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/67058
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree of Master of Science-Psychology Cognitive and Affective Scienceen
dc.description.abstractPrior research on attentional blink (AB) has demonstrated that although this attention diminishes with exposure to different stimuli, attention training paradigms to reduce AB are still being explored. Questions remain as to whether training with the odd-ball paradigm on an AB task, using features like color and audio will benefit performance and optimize mental resource allocation. The current study compared the effects of color-visual training, audio-visual training and no training (controls) on performance, using Rapid Serial Visual Presentation, in an AB task. Behavioral measurements of interest were: detection accuracy of target 1(T1) and target 2(T2) as a function of the different time lags (relative to T1); and neurological measurements of interest were the amplitude and latency of P300 in response to T1-as measured by event related potentials (ERPs). Behavioral and EEG data were collected from 60 undergraduate psychology participants who were tested individually and for the training were randomly placed in any of the three groups mentioned above. Behavioral results did not reveal evidence of lag 1 sparing and were characterized by a partial AB effect overall - although the audio-visual group was most reflective of the typical AB curve across experimental phases. The data suggests that training effects were observed across groups, as performance significantly increased from pre-test to post-test and performance was also significantly higher for single compared to dual target trials. Recorded EEG data is in the process of being analyzed, hence EEG data are forthcoming.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectHuman information processingen
dc.subjectSelectivity Psychologyen
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.subjectAttentional blinken
dc.subjectSelective attentionen
dc.subjectAttentionen
dc.titleREDUCING ATTENTIONAL BLINK: COLOR VS. SOUNDen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelMSen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology Cognitive and Affective Scienceen


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