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Utilizing student-generated video podcasts in a Japanese English as a Foreign Language classroom

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dc.contributor.advisor Pavlov, Vladimir
dc.contributor.author Christensen, Ami
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-22T13:43:50Z
dc.date.available 2013-05-22T13:43:50Z
dc.date.issued 2013-05-06
dc.identifier.uri http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/65612
dc.description Plan B Paper. 2013. Master of Arts-TESOL--University of Wisconsin-River Falls. English Department. ii, 91 leaves. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 57-65). en
dc.description.abstract Japan has been quick to adopt a variety of innovative technologies. Changing English education, on the other hand, is a very slow process in Japan. Consequently, though Japanese students score high in other subject areas, their abilities in English lag behind other Asian nations. In response, the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) has revised English educational guidelines for all levels of education. Despite these efforts, ineffective teaching methods, low student motivation, and unique cultural factors contribute to Japanese students' poor listening and speaking skills in English. The incorporation of information and communications technology (ICT) into English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms has been suggested as a possible tool for increasing student motivation and enhancing listening and speaking skills. Audio and video podcasts are examples of ICT tools that can be easily adapted for use in EFL classrooms. In this paper will discuss how podcasts enhance English skills by providing additional time-on-task, improving listening and speaking skills, addressing a variety of learner needs and styles, and increasing student motivation. I will explain the benefits and potential drawbacks to using podcasts in EFL classrooms. Through the lens of digital natives and technology saturation, I will explore how podcasts may be especially effective in a Japanese EFL setting. Finally, I will outline a plan for integrating student-created video podcasting into a high school EFL class in Japan. en
dc.description.provenance Submitted by Heidi Southworth (heidi.southworth@uwrf.edu) on 2013-05-22T13:43:15Z No. of bitstreams: 1 AmiChristensen.pdf: 2062082 bytes, checksum: ccf65247fc5caf2c0bab257930d49757 (MD5) en
dc.description.provenance Approved for entry into archive by Heidi Southworth(heidi.southworth@uwrf.edu) on 2013-05-22T13:43:50Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 AmiChristensen.pdf: 2062082 bytes, checksum: ccf65247fc5caf2c0bab257930d49757 (MD5) en
dc.description.provenance Made available in DSpace on 2013-05-22T13:43:50Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 AmiChristensen.pdf: 2062082 bytes, checksum: ccf65247fc5caf2c0bab257930d49757 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-05-06 en
dc.subject Podcasts en
dc.subject Educational technology en
dc.subject English language--Study and teaching (Secondary)--Japan--Computer-assisted instruction en
dc.subject Podcasting en
dc.subject English language--Study and teaching (Secondary)--Japan en
dc.title Utilizing student-generated video podcasts in a Japanese English as a Foreign Language classroom en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.level MA
thesis.degree.discipline TESOL

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