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dc.contributor.advisorKlemp, Annette
dc.contributor.authorHenretty, Collette
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T19:28:04Z
dc.date.available2013-05-16T19:28:04Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/65556
dc.descriptionPlan B Paper. 2013. Master of Arts-TESOL--University of Wisconsin-River Falls. English Department. 77 leaves. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 59-63).en
dc.description.abstractSince the 1960s, computers have been used within the language classroom as a supplemental tool to enhance instruction in the target language. Teachers have incorporated the computer into their lessons to provide additional support and perhaps supply a clearer understanding of the content to the students. With the progress of technology, the computer has become a much more efficient machine, which is a clear indication as to why it is being increasingly used in the classroom. Currently, I teach an English grammar skills course (Reading and Writing Strategies) at a college in the Twin Cities area. I teach in a residential classroom setting, where the students attend class once a week. I deliver the material in a traditional manner: using the white board to define concepts, passing out worksheets to practice the material, setting up pair/group work activities. In addition, the students also use the computer in my classroom to perform practice exercises while focusing on the content. I have been teaching for quite some time, both at the college level and in the public sector. Incorporating the computer into the lessons has always been an essential part of my instruction. I use this only as a tool to support, not replace my instruction. I have noticed that students find value in being given additional resources as they are working on learning the core concepts of the class. Moreover, the computer often is an engaging tool that retains students' interest while they are working on the content. The course (Reading and Writing Strategies) that I teach is offered to both native and non-native English speakers, and both types of students are combined into the same class. This course reviews basic grammatical concepts for all students. The nonnative English student makes different language errors/mistakes as opposed to the native speaker. Therefore, it is imperative that additional resources are provided to nonnative learners to assist them in their language learning and allow them to focus on areas that specific to their needs. In addition, these resources will help future instructors if faced with a similar situation.en
dc.subjectEnglish language--Computer-assisted instructionen
dc.subjectEnglish language--Study and teaching--Foreign speakersen
dc.subjectComputer-Assisted Language Learningen
dc.subjectCALLen
dc.subjectEnglish language--Study and teaching--Foreign speakers--Computer-assisted instructionen
dc.subjectTESOLen
dc.titleComputer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL): instructing native and non-native English speakers in a mixed classroom environmenten
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelMA
thesis.degree.disciplineTESOL


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