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dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, David
dc.contributor.authorBremer, Emma Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-05T16:46:23Z
dc.date.available2013-02-05T16:46:23Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/64728
dc.description.abstractNorth America was home to a vast set of trade networks both prehistorically and historically. In several instances key passages within these networks were controlled by societies who acted as middlemen. This position allowed them to command great power and wealth, which created tension with their neighbors and trade partners. This study examines how the Monongahela of the upper Ohio River valley (A.D. 1100-1635), the Mohawk of the Mohawk valley (A.D. 1525-1776), and the Meskwaki of the Fox River Passage (A.D. 1665-1730) settled within their territories and how these decisions may have reflected considerations including subsistence, control of routes, and defense.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Commerce -- History.en
dc.subjectMeskwaki Indians.en
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Fox River Passage -- 1665-1730.en
dc.subjectMonongahela Indians.en
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Ohio River Valley -- 1100-1635.en
dc.subjectMohawk Indians.en
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- New York (State) -- Mohawk River Valley -- History -- 1525-1776.en
dc.subjectArchaeology -- North America.en
dc.subjectArchaeology and history.en
dc.subjectArchaeology -- Methodology.en
dc.titleStrategic middlemen: ?b Monongahela, Mohawk, and Meskwaki settlements in a trade landscapeen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelBSen
thesis.degree.disciplineArchaeologyen


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