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dc.contributor.advisorNewton, Jocelyn H.
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Michelle S.
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-26T18:28:54Z
dc.date.available2011-09-26T18:28:54Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/54409
dc.description.abstractDespite multiple studies indicating that as overall resilience increases, overall level of depression decreases, little is known about the specific factors that contribute to this relationship. This study examined the predictive relationship between factors of resilience, number of stressors, and factors of depression in adolescents utilizing multivariate multiple regression with canonical correlation analysis (CCA). Consistent with past research, overall resilience was negatively correlated with overall depression, as determined by univariate correlation analysis. The equanimity and meaning factors of resilience contributed the most to the prediction of factors of depression. Further, number of stressors was significant predictor of depression, indicating that reducing stressors such as difficulty with peers at school and discrimination may reduce adolescents' risk for depression. These results were discussed with implications for the school-based tiered prevention and intervention programs of Response to Intervention (Rtl) and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). Qualitative data about adolescent support systems and coping strategies were also analyzed and discussed. Further areas of research include experimental designs that assess the effectiveness of resilience interventions. With greater understanding of this relationship, school psychologists can better support students' mental health needs both as a preventative measure and for intervention purposes.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectCanonical correlation (Statistics)en
dc.subjectMental illness - Treatment.en
dc.subjectBehavioral assessment of children.en
dc.subjectStress in children.en
dc.subjectDepression in adolescence.en
dc.titleFactors of resiliency and depression in adolescentsen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelEd.Sen
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen


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