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dc.contributor.advisorMann, John W. W.
dc.contributor.advisorWaters, Matthew W. (Matthew William)
dc.contributor.authorBuckli, Christina
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-08T19:35:32Z
dc.date.available2011-07-08T19:35:32Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/53676
dc.description.abstractMany ancient sources explained the characteristics of pederasty (the physical and emotional relationship between a man and boy) in ancient Greece throughout the Classical Period. Many ancient texts portrayed the approval or acceptance of pederasty among its authors and the general ancient Greek population. However, ancient Greek Old Comedy was one of the exceptions. Aristophanes, a playwright of Old Comedy, disapproved of the practice of pederasty, especially the role of the pathic (a male who was anally penetrated). Aristophanes addressed the topic of pederasty and whether the general public, the elite, or a combination of the two participated. Aristophanes' comedies gave clear examples of who participated in pederasty and whether or not it was accepted. His comedies also confirmed other ancient source descriptions of pederasty. These confirmed topics dealt primarily with physical characteristics, physical acts, and gift giving.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUSGZE AS333en
dc.subjectSodomy--Greece--Historyen
dc.subjectSodomy in literature--Greeceen
dc.subjectAristophanes--Political and social viewsen
dc.title"Vile Effeminate Boylove" : Pederasty in Greek Culture and Aristophanes' Attitude Concerning Iten
dc.typeThesisen


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