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dc.contributor.advisorHendrix, C. Russel
dc.contributor.advisorMikat, Richard
dc.contributor.advisorFoster, Carl
dc.contributor.authorWalraven, Lee
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-24T16:27:05Z
dc.date.available2011-06-24T16:27:05Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/53467
dc.description.abstractThe ability to prescribe and monitor exercise can be a difficult task for fitness professionals. Previous studies have shown a drift upward in Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) during prolonged exercise. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the Talk Test (TT) to prescribe exercise and the effect on RPE over a 60 minute trial. Twelve subjects performed three exercise trials at last positive-I (LP-l), last positive (LP), and equivocal (EQ) intensities, according to incremental TT responses. During each trial heart rate (HR), lactate (HLa), RPE, and TT score were recorded every ten minutes, along with a session RPE score 30 minutes following the exercise trial. HR, HLa, RPE, and IT score were all significantly higher in the EQ trial compared to the LP and LP-l trials. Session RPE and mean RPE were significantly higher in the EQ trial compared to the LP-l and LP trials. There was no significant difference between HR, HLa, RPE, session RPE, mean RPE, or TT between the LP-l and LP trials. This study concluded that exercise can be safely prescribed and monitored using the TT when exercise intensities are prescribed from the LP and LP-l.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectOxygen in the body - Physiological effecten
dc.subjectTreadmill exercise tests - Physiological aspectsen
dc.titleRating of perceived drift during steady state treadmill exerciseen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelMSen
thesis.degree.disciplineClinical Exercise Physiologyen


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