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dc.contributor.advisorWolfgram, Susan Men
dc.contributor.authorAntolik, Brittanyen
dc.contributor.authorZander, Alyssa
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-09T12:41:22Z
dc.date.available2011-06-09T12:41:22Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/53354
dc.description.abstractThe increasing frequency of the internet and other technology use to engage in social activities has spurred the question of how individuals currently view infidelity, related to the many virtual and non-virtual aspects of modern life today (Henline, Lamke, & Howard, 2007). This nonrandom pilot study investigated definitions of infidelity by surveying 64 male and female college students at a Midwestern college. It was hypothesized that male and females would differ in their definitions of infidelity, based on the literature and the Symbolic Interaction theory. Survey data was statistically analyzed using cross-tabulations, mean comparisons, independent t-tests, and reliability analysis. Results indicated no significant gender differences. Males and females included both technological and nontechnological interactions in their definitions of infidelity. It would be recommended that implications for practitioners be suspended until future research would involve a larger sample and also to compare groups not only based on gender, but if currently in a partnered relationship.en
dc.rightsAll rights reserved. No part of this journal may be reproduced in any form without the permission of the University of Wisconsin-Stout.en
dc.subject.lcshMan-woman relationshipsen
dc.subject.lcshCollege students--Attitudesen
dc.subject.lcshCollege students--Sexual behavioren
dc.subject.lcshSexual ethicsen
dc.titleCollege student's definitions of infidelityen
dc.typeArticleen


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