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dc.contributor.advisorMenefee, Joanen
dc.contributor.advisorGjevre, Jonnaen
dc.contributor.authorWitcher, Diana
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-06T16:43:24Z
dc.date.available2011-06-06T16:43:24Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/53212
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the works of poets Dante Alighieri and Han-shan, focusing on their communication through detailed visual descriptions of their subjects. This technique results in a vivid literary painting, informed by the poet's religiosity and personal experience. Dante was a known public figure in 12th century Florence, who later suffered exile from his home. His work is both political and overtly religious. He expresses a dynamic, dogmatic spirituality informed by the theology of 12th century Christianity. He was educated, versed in the science of optics and utilized allegory in his work. Han-shan was an educated recluse, his poems not as overtly religious. In his poetry, he addresses Buddhist concepts of stillness, endurance, and close observation of nature. The beauty of nature largely influenced his work. Both poets observe, criticize, and comment upon the spiritual and political issues of their time. Their poems enlighten, instruct, and provide inspired insight upon spirituality and the human condition.en
dc.rightsAll rights reserved. No part of this journal may be reproduced in any form without the permission of the University of Wisconsin-Stout.en
dc.subject.lcshHanshan, 627-649en
dc.subject.lcshAlighieri, Dante, 1265-1321en
dc.subject.lcshItalian poetryen
dc.subject.lcshChinese poetryen
dc.titleDante and Han-shan: masters of visual communicationen
dc.typeArticleen


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