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dc.contributor.advisorTriplett-McBride, T.
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Laura J.
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-08T18:53:48Z
dc.date.available2011-03-08T18:53:48Z
dc.date.issued2000-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/48630
dc.description.abstractThis study was conducted to monitor the training pattens throughout a basketball season in order to determine if a relationship exists between the physical stress of practice and the occurrence of injuries and illnesses in NCAA Division I11 athletes. Ss consisted of college women (N = 12). ranging in age from 18-22 yrs. A Certified Athletic Trainer distributed a questionnaire following each practice, including 2 weeks of preseason, documenting the presence of injury and/or illness relative to the intensity and duration of practice. Training load, training monotony, and training strain were computed using the session RPE method. An increase in injuries occured during times of increased training loads, particularly during the first 2 weeks of formal practice, and immediately subsequent to the holidays. The temporal relationship between training load and injury suggests a causative link (p < 0.01; r = 0.675). The present data suggest that the periodization pattern of basketball training may be linked to the likelihood of illness/injury.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectNational Collegiate Athletic Association. Division IIIen
dc.subjectBasketball - Trainingen
dc.subjectBasketball players - Wounds and injuriesen
dc.subjectBasketball for womenen
dc.titleimpact of training patterns on incidence of illness and injury during a women's basketball seasonen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelMSen
thesis.degree.disciplineExercise and Sport Science-Human Performanceen


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