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dc.contributor.authorHudack, Peter
dc.contributor.authorFelgenhauer, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorSlivinski, Lizzi
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Annie
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-24T20:35:35Z
dc.date.available2011-01-24T20:35:35Z
dc.date.issued2010-12-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/48032
dc.descriptionIncludes charts, survey, graphs, bibliography.en
dc.description.abstractIn 2004, the recovering Wisconsin timber wolf (Canis lupus) population reached the state management goal, set by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, of 350 wolves. Since then, the state's wolf population has nearly doubled to the current population of 690 wolves (97 percent increase). This recent surge has caused alarm among a vocal component of citizens from northern Wisconsin; citizens who have the most frequent contact with wolves. Meanwhile, in Madison, residents' attitudes are largely unchanged, as the residents seem unaffected by the burgeoning wolf population, due to the nearly complete absence of personal interaction with wolves.en
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectWisconsinen
dc.subjectManagementen
dc.subjectUrbanen
dc.subjectWolvesen
dc.titleExploring Geospatial Trends in Urban Attitudes Toward Wolves in Wisconsin and Implications for Future Managementen
dc.typeField projecten


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