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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Douglas N.
dc.contributor.authorGoldrick-Rab, Sara
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-10T14:24:15Z
dc.date.available2010-12-10T14:24:15Z
dc.date.issued2010-12
dc.identifier.other2010-023
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/47532
dc.description.abstractThe authors examine two explanations for why productivity in academic degrees granted by American colleges and universities is declining. First, few popular programs and strategies in higher education are cost-effective, and those that are may be underutilized. Second, a lack of rigorous evidence about the costs and effects of higher education practices intersects with a lack of incentive to use cost-effectiveness to guide decision-making.en
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLa Follette School Working Papers
dc.titleThe (Un)Productivity of American Higher Education: From "Cost Disease" to Cost-Effectivenessen
dc.typeWorking Paperen


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