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dc.contributor.advisorGreenlee, Joy
dc.contributor.advisorFater, Dennis
dc.contributor.advisorKaufman, Wayne
dc.contributor.authorKerner, Wendy
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-01T23:42:56Z
dc.date.available2010-03-01T23:42:56Z
dc.date.issued1989-10-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/38836
dc.description.abstractEach Ss performed the two submaximal tests to exhaustion after taking an artificially sweetened lemonade beverage labeled "caffeine" previous to one test and a beverage labeled "noncaffeine" previous to the other test. The order of the tests was randomly chosen. Respiratory gases were analysed and heart rates were monitored for cross-country runners (n=l3) from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse, who ran 40-60 mi/wk, while each performed a V02 max test and two submaximal tests on a treadmill. The workload at which the subjects ran during the submaximal tests was determined by the grade and speed at which they reached , approximately 85% of their V0 2 max during the initial max test. A dependent t-test performed on the times to exhaustion, RPE's at minutes 2 and 12, heart rates, and RER's between the caffeine and noncaffeine trials revealed no significant differences (p < .05; t > 1.356) for any of these parameters. The results indicated that the belief that the subjects had taken a significant amount of caffeine did not produce a significant change in endurance performance.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectCaffeine -- Psychological aspectsen
dc.titleInfluence of perceived caffeine ingestion upon submaximal exercise to exhaustionen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelMSen
thesis.degree.disciplineAdult Fitness/Cardiac Rehabilitationen


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