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dc.contributor.advisorSchaupp, Kristin P.
dc.contributor.authorDierich, Chris
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-03T14:57:21Z
dc.date.available2009-08-03T14:57:21Z
dc.date.issued2009-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/35724
dc.descriptionColor poster with text and diagrams (Spring 2009)en
dc.description.abstractPhilosophers have been interested in what constitutes Knowledge for centuries. The claim Knowledge=Justified True Belief can be traced back as far as Plato. With the use of a few examples Edmund Gettier showed that JTB is necessary but not sufficient for knowledge. Alvin Goldman tries to address this by requiring that there be a causal connection between the fact that makes something true and the person knowing it. Because inductive reasoning plays a crucial role in the formation of knowledge, we will suggest that theories with causal elements are subject to criticism.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Wisconsin--Eau Claire Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUSGZE AS589en
dc.subjectGettier problemen
dc.subjectKnowledge, Theory ofen
dc.subjectPostersen
dc.titleCausal Theories of Knowledge : Why They Leave Gettier Problems Unresolved.en
dc.title.alternativeA Critique of the Causal Theory of Knowledge.
dc.typePresentationen


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  • Student Research Day
    Posters of collaborative student/faculty research presented at Student Research Day

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