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dc.contributor.advisorWright, Ashley K. E.
dc.contributor.authorBartelt, Crystal A.
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-07T16:45:29Z
dc.date.available2009-01-07T16:45:29Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-07T16:45:29Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/31752
dc.description.abstractVictorian women are not necessarily known for their extravagant lifestyles outside the home and wardrobe. There are exceptions to this stereotypical lifestyle, and some women prove in many ways that women are not just created to be housewives. Mary Kingsley is one such woman that was breaking the mold of a Victorian woman. Having an adventurous spirit, not desiring a husband and family, and educating herself are ways in which Kingsley proved to be living by her own means. Although this behavior was discouraged for most young women, in Kingsley's case she was encouraged to travel and live life to her fullest desires. As a result of her ambition Kingsley made two trips to Africa, wrote three books among other small journal articles, and contributed to the British Museum specimens of fish and insects through collaboration with Dr. Gunther. After losing her family at a young age Kingsley found a new meaning of family through her travels and this would be her most fulfilling type of life, through the vast studying of science in West and Southern Africa.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAS333
dc.subjectWomen travelers--Great Britain--Biography.en
dc.subjectWomen travelers--Africa--Biography.en
dc.subjectFeminists--Great Britain--Biography.en
dc.subjectKingsley, Mary Henrietta, 1862-1900--Travel--Africa.en
dc.subjectKingsley, Mary Henrietta, 1862-1900.en
dc.titleMary Kingsley: A Different Type of Feministen
dc.typeThesisen


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