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dc.contributor.advisorBrice, Glenn
dc.contributor.advisorTerry, Larry
dc.contributor.advisorPorcari, John
dc.contributor.advisorWard, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorLuther II, Harold C.
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-19T19:41:27Z
dc.date.available2008-08-19T19:41:27Z
dc.date.issued1997-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/29008
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if using a new form of creatine monohydrate (Phosphagems -EAS) could increase muscular strength and favorably alter body composition. Twenty-seven college-aged Ss were randomly placed into a placebo or creatine group. Subjects in the creatine group were required to ingest 20 grams maintenance of the supplement for 5 days (loading phase) and 5 grams everyday thereafter (phase), while the placebo group took an identical looking and tasting product. The supplement or placebo was distributed in a double-blind protocol. Ss performed 1 RMs for the bench press and squat, and body composition was measured using hydrostatic weighing before and after supplementation/training. For the training program, both groups participated in a 6 week, 4 day split, resistance training program. Supplementation began the first week of the resistance program. The posttests were performed the week following the completion of the resistance program. Data were analyzed using a 2-way ANOVA with repeated measures and a Tukey's post hoc test. Both groups increased significantly (p < .05) in bench press and squat strength. The placebo group increased 22.9 lbs in the bench press and 59.6 lbs in the squat, while the creatine group increased 30.0 lbs in the bench press and 46.2 lbs in the squat in 6 weeks. Differences between groups were not statistically significant (p > .05). Total body and lean body weight increased significantly in the creatine group only (p < .05). Total body weight increased 5.4 lbs, with 4.8 lbs being lean body weight. No changes were found in % body fat or fat weight in either group. The results of this study indicate that creatine monohydrate does not improve muscular strength and/or body composition. However, the results of this research suggest that through a scientifically sound resistance training program, significant strength gains will occur along with slight improvements in body composition. Further research with the effects of creatine supplementation on muscular strength and body composition is needed.
dc.format.extent1289249 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectCreatine -- Physiological effecten
dc.subjectMuscle strengthen
dc.subjectBody compostionen
dc.titleEffects of creatine monohydrate supplementation on muscular strength and body compositionen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.levelMS
thesis.degree.disciplineExercise and Sport Science--Human Performance


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