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dc.contributor.advisorGilkey, George R.
dc.contributor.authorLee, Gordon H.
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-21T18:09:23Z
dc.date.available2007-09-21T18:09:23Z
dc.date.issued1968-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/18735
dc.description.abstractThe First World War brought about drastic changes in the United States militarily, politically, and socially. The upheaval brought about by that period gave rise to the Ku Klux Klan throughout the country. The Klan considered itself a reform movement promoting 100 per cent Americanism, separation of church and state, Protestant fundamentalism, White supremacy, anti-Catholicism, and anti-Semitism. The Klan was brought to Wisconsin in 1920 and after a rather slow start, it enjoyed some success in the years 1923, 1924, and 1925. Because of poor leadership, a shortage of issues, and a growing resentment against hate speakers, the organization failed. By 1925 the Klan was having membership problems and by 1928 it was almost nonexistent.
dc.format.extent1686263 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectKu Klux Klan (1915- ) -- Wisconsinen
dc.subjectWisconsin -- Politics and government -- 1848-1950en
dc.titleThe Ku Klux Klan in Wisconsin in the 1920sen
dc.typeThesisen


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