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From Homeland to the Heartland : the Resettlement and Acculturation of First Generation Hmong Americans in Eau Claire, WI

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Author(s)
Traczek, James
Advisor(s)
Lang, Katherine H.; Chamberlain, Oscar B.
Date
Jul 13, 2007
Subject(s)
Hmong (Asian people)--Cultural assimilation--Wisconsin--Eau Claire; Hmong (Asian people)--Wisconsin--Eau Claire; Hmong Americans--Wisconsin--Eau Claire; Acculturation--Wisconsin--Eau Claire
Series
USGZE AS333
Abstract
In the 1970s, the Hmong people of Laos fled their homeland in search of freedom from persecution by the communist regime in Laos. Most moved to refugee camps in Thailand, and then relocated to the United States. Historical research in regard to this story is scarce at this point, with most of the focus on the Hmong that settled in California or the metropolitan United States. This paper is focused on the story of first generation Hmong Americans as they settled in rural America, namely Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Eau Claire was attractive because it offered quality education for people with diverse needs, whether the need be grade school, college, or ESL. Eau Claire was also attractive because of the rural lifestyle it offered. Once arriving in Eau Claire, the first generation Hmong Americans were forced to deal with many problems, such as prejudice, economic recession and governmental policy, the language barrier, and unemployment. The formation of ethnic enclaves, and the groups associated with this formation, aided the acculturation process, which may not have led to much advancement for first generation Hmong Americans, but helped them gain their footing in American society.
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http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/8537 
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