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Talkin bout My Generalization: Confronting Assumptions About Attitudes Toward Reference Service in the Changing Library Workforce

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dc.contributor.author Markgraf, Jill
dc.contributor.author Kishel, Hans
dc.contributor.author Jennings, Eric
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-11T22:11:16Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-11T22:11:16Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Jennings, Eric, Hans Kishel, and Jill Markgraf. Talkin' 'bout my Generalization: Confronting Assumptions about Attitudes Toward Reference Service in the Changing Library Workforce. In A Declaration of Interdependence: Proceedings of the Fifteenth National Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries, March 30-April 2, 2011, edited by Dawn M. Mueller, 430-447. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2011. en
dc.identifier.uri http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/52545
dc.description.abstract A profession that has long been dominated by the Baby Boom generation is ushering in new generations of librarians. Because the shift in the library workforce is creating a new intergenerational mix of co-workers, librarians at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire-who themselves represent the three prevalent generations in the workforce-set out to explore potential differences in attitudes toward reference service in academic libraries. Rather than rely on personal anecdotes and assumptions about generational differences in attitudes, investigators sought to collect data reflecting attitudes and opinions. A survey, Attitudes Toward Reference Services, was sent to randomly selected academic library staff members across the United States. This survey asked questions about the changing nature of reference work, staffing a reference desk, important characteristics and skills for reference librarians to have, and more. Through the survey, investigators hoped to determine if differences in attitudes toward reference service broke down along generational lines, and-if not-what might be some variables that influenced attitudinal differences. en
dc.description.provenance Submitted by Eric Jennings (jenninge@uwec.edu) on 2011-05-11T22:11:16Z No. of bitstreams: 1 talkin_bout_generalization.pdf: 1206965 bytes, checksum: 647dafd994749846e51b1b35722ec09c (MD5) en
dc.description.provenance Made available in DSpace on 2011-05-11T22:11:16Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 talkin_bout_generalization.pdf: 1206965 bytes, checksum: 647dafd994749846e51b1b35722ec09c (MD5) Previous issue date: 2011 en
dc.subject Generation Y en
dc.subject Generation X en
dc.subject Baby Boomer en
dc.subject assumptions en
dc.subject attitudes en
dc.subject academic libraries en
dc.subject generational differences en
dc.subject reference services en
dc.subject Millennials en
dc.subject libraries en
dc.subject generations en
dc.subject intergenerational workplace en
dc.title Talkin bout My Generalization: Confronting Assumptions About Attitudes Toward Reference Service in the Changing Library Workforce en
dc.type Article en

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