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THE ROLE OF INTERPERSONAL, MASS MEDIA, AND INTERNET COMMUNICATION ON CHANGES IN SELF-REPORTED HEALTH BEHAVIOR AND SKILLS

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Author(s)
Nunenkamp, Tara A.
Advisor(s)
Filipova, Anna
Date
Dec 2010
Subject(s)
Behavior modification; Self-care - health; Health attitudes; Health behavior
Abstract
Communication plays an integral role in changing health behaviors. Seeking health related information from interpersonal, mass media, and Internet communication is a common trend. Research on the use of the various communication channels for health purposes reveals the mode of communication can influence an individual?s perception of their health condition and ultimately their behavior. This study focuses on whether personal health information found through the use of interpersonal, mass media, or Internet communication changes one?s self-reported health behavior and skills. A statistical analysis was completed using the 2007 Health Tracking Household Survey conducted by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) between April 2007 and January 2008. The original sample includes 17,797 respondents from 9,407 U.S. families. The national sample was collected using computerassisted random telephone interviews. The literature suggests the channel used to obtain personal health information may have an impact on self-reported health behaviors and health skills. Results of the statistical analysis indicated the channels of communication used to obtain health information did have an impact on self-reported health behavior and health skills. The strongest predictors of health behavior change were obtaining personal health information from books, the Internet and sharing personal health information with the healthcare provider. Future research for policy makers should be directed toward integrating traditional methods of obtaining personal health information and non-traditional methods of obtaining health information with regard to changes in health behavior and health skills.
Description
A Field Project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Public Administration Health Care
Permanent link
http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/49187 
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